Memorandum of Decision Re: Envelopes

DO NOT PUBLISH This case disposition has no value as precedent and is not intended for publication. Any publication, either in print or electronically, is contrary to the intent and wishes of the court.
Decisions
IN THE UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA
In re GLENWOOD CONSTRUCTION, INC.,                                               No. 95-12714      Debtor. ___________________________/
Memorandum
      In the above Chapter 11 case, Wells Fargo Bank holds security interests in two 1993 Chevrolet Blazers. The debtor stipulated to relief from the automatic stay as to both vehicles. Counsel for Wells Fargo then prepared two separate stipulations and filed them separately, causing duplicate docketing and incurring two filing fees. He noticed the stipulations to creditors, and then submitted two separate orders for signature along with a total of 71(!) envelopes for service of the order. This is a bit much for two three-year-old Chevy Blazers.      First of all, there is no requirement that separate motions for relief from the stay be filed for each vehicle. The court has polled all of the judges in this district and judges from each of the three other divisions have confirmed that they have no such requirement. Filing separate motions is a waste of clerk time and creditor money.      Secondly, Local Rule 9022-1(b) clearly defines those persons for whom envelopes should be submitted. In this case, no envelope is necessary for the debtor because it stipulated in writing (L.R. 9022-1(b)(i). No envelopes are necessary for the creditors because they did not object, request a hearing, or appear (L.R. 9022-1(b), last sentence). Only envelopes for the creditor's counsel and the U.S. Trustee were appropriate. The court has consigned the 71 envelopes to the recycling bin, in the hope that they will return some day as something useful. In the meantime, counsel is requested to submit new orders with the proper number of envelopes and refrain from filing separate motions except when absolutely necessary to avoid confusion.
Dated: March 13, 1996                                               _______________________                                                                                               Alan Jaroslovsky                                                                                               U.S. Bankruptcy